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Neige et Noirceur: Thanatonaut

Thanatonaut, the latest effort from Spiritus who records under the moniker of Neige et Noirceur, offers a temporary departure from the artist’s frozen ambient black metal that has been turning underground metal heads for the last couple of years.

This time around Neige et Noirceur implements the sound of droning ambient doom, recalling the likes of Thergothon and Winter as well momentarily conjuring comparisons to contemporary players such as Khanate (R.I.P.). The recording is described by the artist as an ode to the “navigators through death” and inspired by the book Les Thanatonautes, a 1994 science fiction novel French writer Bernard Werber. Thanatonaut is a single long track consisting in a few movements that blend seamlessly together. It opens up with environmental recordings of what appears to be howling winter winds, similar to what you would expect to find on a Francisco López release. While Spiritus is not the first musician within the metal genre to implement actual field recordings into his music it’s certainly not a common practice. The sound of wind and darkness is accompanied by spacey electronics and remains the focal point of the music until drums, bass and guitars are abruptly introduced around the six-minute mark of the piece. This allows the listener to settle into the desired mindset of the composer and works wonderfully in terms of building a dark and menacing vibe. The track continues on in a fairly traditional doom approach for about 8 minutes and then slowly subsides back to its atmospheric dark-ambient beginnings.

Like many within the genre Neige et Noirceur does not exist in the real world and cannot be witnessed live. Up until the present he has released a handful of beautiful hand made limited edition releases available directly from the artist. We are pleased to bring to light this latest offering and to help spread the music of Neige et Noirceur.




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